• Home

Amber Room series explores the condition of nostalgia in the context of migratory experiences and shifts in political regimes. It is made over two years in between Lithuania and Scotland, however I have attempted the theme a few times before. I have worked on unfinished pieces The Magic City and Looking for Signs of Summer in the Rainy Country since 2008, but both were left behind as I struggled to conclude them.

Continue reading

My project ‘Exquisite Errors‘ is about the beauty of deviation. We live in a world where it has become customary to attach a label to a person who deviates from the norm. Since the American DSM, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, is also used in the Netherlands, Dutch adults and children who differ from the majority are labeled and classified as patients suffering from ADHD, PDD-NOS, Asperger’s, Borderline or Autism/ASD.

Continue reading

This is a series of street photographs taken in the City of Swansea, South Wales. This series is a glance at contemporary South Wales; it was shot over a period of about 8 months, on and off. None of the images are staged; these are all photographs of completely random situations I stumbled across while wandering around the cities in “flanuer’ fashion, reacting instinctively to events unfolding around me. I think this series counters some of the stereotypes that South Wales seems to be shackled with and portrays  the area in a different perspective, a place abundant with people from all walks of life, rich in history and a vast blend of cultures.

Continue reading

I come from a small village located in the east of Holland. A place where ambition is not very high on people’s priority list. Pursuing a form of higher education was also not really encouraged. I never felt like I belonged there. I was a dreamer, an outsider to them, wanted to get away from everyday life and always dreamt of escaping to the big city. It is there where I would feel understood and start anew.

Continue reading

This series of images are little windows into Havana, and capture just a drop of the spirit you feel from the city and it’s people. The energy there is intoxicating, you never know what is going to happen next. Cuba is so evocative, it is like being in the 1950’s, there is an extraordinary aesthetic there. The mix and the diversity of faces is very inspiring and a wonderful city to shoot in.

Continue reading

The series “Inner Urban” speaks to the complex relationship between humans and the urban environments we build and inhabit, therefore the messages and themes driving this series are multi-faceted and a bit circuitous. Definitively, I can tell you that this series was brought to life to speak to what I perceive as many of the shared concerns that are a by-product of our growing global urban existence.

Continue reading

I’ve been working on this body of work – Q&A, for a little more than four years now. I usually describe it as an investigation into the visual mores applied when photographing the U.S.A, and an inquiry into the relationship between a place and its own mythos. I’m really excited by the idea that for a significant proportion of people, ‘America’ exists visually as a somewhat abstract concept. The history of the last 60 years of popular culture is, with the odd deviation, the history of American popular culture. As a result, there is this enormous mess of visual tropes which all point to various notions of what the U.S.A. look like; flags, mountains, cars, guns, roads etc. This is at its most effective I think when you realise that this strange quirk of culture has the power to provoke a familiarity for a place without the need to have actually visited it. There is no doubt other places in the world that prompt a similar reaction but none in quite the same way or on the same scale as the visual motifs of America do.

Continue reading

In 2015 I was asked to visit Dagestan for a book project I was working on. As an Asia specialist, the North Caucasus was a region I had never been to before and knew ever less about. Usually, I try to learn as much about a place as much as I can before I visit, through reading books, reports etc… but Dagestan had very little especially outside of Russian language websites. So my arrival at Makhachkala airport was really the beginning of my learning process. Fortunate to be connected to some wonderful local photographers for the next few weeks they showed me their Dagestan, the mountains they loved, the villages they lived and the culture that they adored. As a result, my photographs are really a visual personal discovery, a documentary that started at zero and slowly developed as I slowly learned and explored this new place. I learned about the people and their ways as I began to photograph them.

Continue reading